Academics Front and Center on a Public University Site

The joy of being at UMW for so long is that knowledge of the institution becomes so granular, layered, and subtle, that you can begin to delve below the surface and pick apart how to make it all work. The UMW website has been an iterative laboratory of ideas for me, barring a 3 1/2-year period where a re-org moved the website to a different office. Each redesign I’ve embarked on– 2003, 2004, 2006, and 2010–has been done with more than the goal of a design facelift. At each stage, I’ve tried to join together messages about the University in a coherent whole, doing the best I can with the resources and tools available.

Barring 2004, which was largely a cosmetic and URL update for the purposes of our name change from “Mary Washington College” to “University of Mary Washington”, each re-design has included upgrades to authoring and site management tools to expand content management of the public site to areas deep within the institution. By 2007, when I handed the site over for maintenance to the new Webmaster, we had 210 web administrators on the academic and administrative sides with nearly ALL using a single look and feel in a single system. Not to brag, but, I don’t see a lot of Universities achieving that.

What seemed impressive to my contemporaries at other institutions was the consistent look and feel at all levels. But, in all honesty, although that was the agenda from the powers that be, it was not MY agenda. I wanted to build a culture of awareness for each user to feel like a responsible steward of public information given our role as a public institution. I evolved into this way of thinking after having the privilege of participating in interminable Thursday-morning DoIT meetings with the likes of Chip German, Gardner Campbell, Martha Burtis, and Jim Groom.

Enter UMW Blogs and WordPress, and a new way of web authoring at UMW, moved the “node” of information from the department to the person. What resulted was amazing open conversation on all the remarkable disciplines at this rich jewel of a liberal arts and science university. By 2008, the institution had the courage to link to UMW Blogs from its home page. But this was just dipping our toes in the water of truly exposing what was happening on our campus.

When I returned to my role as Webmaster, and later Director of Web Communications, in July 2010, the institution was once again poised for a redesign. But, redesign with all this rich groundwork already laid would have to reach to an even higher purpose: to turn an exposition of an IDEALIZED UMW to a public conversation with the REAL UMW.

The fact is, UMW Blogs is the most effective web tool for telling the world about what is really happening with teaching and learning here — our core mission. It’s more powerful than any beautiful and easy-to-navigate website can deliver. Through WordPress, FeedPress, and Banner web services, we are finally building a public web presence that is flexible and PERMEABLE. The goal: to expose real-time academic activity as THE driver to make anyone interested in coming to a place that graduates 21st century critical thinkers who can compete in the global information economy. Martha Burtis characterized this as (paraphrasing): “Not online learning, but learning online.”

Over the next few months, please look for the rollout of the following features on UMW public site to enable just that to begin earnest:

  1. Banner Web Services Plugin: Through a core plugin, we are developing a way to consume real-time public data from our Banner systems. Banner data standards for departments, faculty, courses, and disciplines are essentially built into the taxonomy of the WordPress networks, enabling aggregation of information from many points to many different locations. Thanks to Enterprise Application Services for creating all of those nifty web services for us!
  2. Faculty Professional Pages: Each faculty member will be able to write their own online bio (proofreading still available), publish and aggregate all of their blogs and social media to a single web page on the PUBLIC WEBSITE, and have their current courses and department affiliations, including any UMW Blogs related to current courses, automagically appear on the same page. A sample faculty member will look like this:New Faculty Aggregation Point
  3. Majors, Minors, Courses of Study: Banner data enables aggregation of catalogue data, blogs, videos, news releases, faculty, and social bookmarks for each discipline. Each discipline’s feed is controlled by that department.  This gives a real-time snapshot of what’s happening at UMW in that discipline right now, as the department wants to showcase how it teaches within the discipline. It also gives an apples-to-apples, in-depth look at all disciplines in one place, looking something like this:
  4. FeedWordPress: With all of the above in place, DTLT will work in a standalone installation of FeedWordPress to curate, slice, dice and combine feeds for consumption anywhere on the UMW Multi-Network from UMW Blogs sites, and back.
  5. University Taxonomy: We’ve played with this a bit, and have a version of it in place on the Document repository, but we have not institutionalized or developed a final UMW Taxonomy tool that all sites and blogs can use to categorize their content so that it can be aggregated with other content on the site. How this plays out under the hood is unknown. We will need faculty and staff input on what those taxonomies should be.

If you are still reading, I thank you for hanging in with me. This thinking began in 2008, and this actual development has been going on in our office for months now. Jim Groom’s post last week gave me the kick in the pants I needed to start writing about it in more concrete terms. He’s useful that way :)

Oh, and yes, Curtiss and I would be happy to put together developer and user documentation once the lion’s share of this work is complete. Curtiss Grymala has released all of his UMW plugins to the WordPress codex, and we thoroughly support the culture of open source development.

2 comments ↓

#1 Reverend on 07.26.12 at 2:52 pm

YOu rock, Cathy, thanks for this overview and for being awesome. The work you and Curtiss are doing isn’t getting nearly enough recognition, let’s change that.

#2 Noel Derecki on 07.26.12 at 4:26 pm

Very cool. :)

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